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How an African slave helped Boston fight smallpox - The Boston Globe

medievalpoc:

The idea behind this radical new treatment came from Africa, specifically from a slave named Onesimus, who shared his knowledge with Cotton Mather, the town’s leading minister and his legal owner. Boston still suffered dreadfully, but thanks to Onesimus and Mather, the terror linked to smallpox began to recede after Africans rolled up their sleeves—literally—to show Boston how inoculation worked. The story of how Boston began to overcome smallpox illustrates the strife that epidemics can cause, but also the encouraging notion that humans can communicate remedies as quickly as they communicate germs—and that the solutions we most need often come from the places we least expect to find them.

Mather had come close to choosing a career in medicine, and devoured the scientific publications of the Royal Society in London. As the society began to turn its attention to inoculation practices around the world, Mather realized that he had an extraordinary expert living in his household. Onesimus was a “pretty Intelligent Fellow,” it had become clear to him. When asked if he’d ever had smallpox, Onesimus answered “Yes and No,” explaining that he had been inoculated with a small amount of smallpox, which had left him immune to the disease. Fascinated, Mather asked for details, which Onesimus provided, and showed him his scar. We can almost hear Onesimus speaking in Mather’s accounts, for Mather took the unusual step of writing out his words with the African accent included—the key phrase was, “People take Juice of Small-Pox; and Cutty-skin, and Putt in a Drop.”

Excited, he investigated among other Africans in Boston and realized that it was a widespread practice; indeed, a slave could be expected to fetch a higher price with a scar on his arm, indicating that he was immune. Mather sent the Royal Society his own reports from the wilds of America, eager to prove the relevance of Boston (and by extension, Cotton Mather) to the global crusade against infectious disease. His interviews with Onesimus were crucial. In 1716, writing to an English friend, he promised that he would be ready to promote inoculation if smallpox ever visited the city again.

American History, but something I think a lot of people would be interested to read.

Under the Radar: Sultana’s Dream | Tor.com

classicladiesofcolor:

Actress Hattie McDaniel was a member of the American Women’s Voluntary Service during WWII.

fandomsandfeminism:

gutterowl:

kissmyasajj:

fuckyeahwarriorwomen:

duckindolans:

daughterofmulan:

theblindninja:

The Pirates Official Posters

What is this glorious looking glory.

WHAT IS THIS

Pirates (2014 film)

Set in the early Joseon Dynasty, a group led by a female pirate and another group led by a male bandit are on a mission to hunt down a whale that swallowed the royal seal bestowed on Joseon from China.

Yes!

Hello yes you have my attention.

-is listening-

queensofthesmilingcoast:

yagazieemezi:

Identity and discovery–at both the collective and personal levels–are themes in the forefront of Omar Victor Diop’s Project Diaspora. A journey through time, the photographic series delves into and exposes less spoken narratives of the role of Africans out of Africa.

With this body of work, Diop challenges us to rethink our own ideas of history and gives answer to his ongoing, internal dialogue of who he is as artist and person.

Starting his research during a four month residency in Màlaga, Spain, where he was immersed in the reality of being a stranger, Diop has focused this first installment on Europe during the 15th through 19th centuries. Inspired by the many baroque artworks created during this time, he considers this period as an awakening of an intense (and previously nonexistent) era of interaction between Africa and the rest of the world. Using portraits of notable Africans in European history as his inspiration, Diop pits their life-journeys and legacies with those of his own, and further defining his intrigue of the singular destinies of travellers and those in alien environments.  (keep reading)

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

Ball been life bwoii

wahnwitzig:

Kindjal from the Caucasus, 1800’s

It’s this emphasis on listening to the victim is the biggest thing that we can take away from both #YesAllGeeks and the End Bullying Panel, as a matter of fact: the better we become at allowing the people who are facing harassment or bullying to speak up about their experiences without judging them or expecting them to be perfect, the more we’re able to tell harassers, whether directly or indirectly, that the behavior they engage in isn’t okay. It may not feel like you’re doing anything when you condemn harassment on an individual level, but when a lot of people are doing the same thing, it adds up—and the fact that it’s such a widespread topic of discussion now when it’s been ignored and swept under the rug for so long proof that it’s possible for things to change. We just need to keep listening.

Masaaki Sasamoto- Cocoro

@LAUNTS